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Why is My GMAT Score Not Increasing?

Introducing new, exciting work from YGC Deputy Coach Jawad Mastaki! –Rowan

Meet a Low Score’s Best Friend: Anxiety.

You studied with diligence. You practiced questions for months. You have gone so far down the rabbit hole that when you went out for pizza last time and were asked what you wanted on top of your margherita, you mumbled out the name of a polygon.

Yet, the morning of the exam, on the very moment you sit down and the countdown begins, your mind goes blank. You stare at the screen at a question that you know how to solve, but your hand is shaking too much to even hold the mouse.

If you have ever felt butterflies in your stomach during an important exam, acting at a school rehearsal, giving a company presentation, or when taking the GMAT itself, then read on.

First, let’s clarify: Anxiety is not inherently bad. When we are anxious our heartbeat accelerates, our blood flows faster, making our senses more alert. It’s a natural body reaction that has allowed our ancestors to survive, to fight or flee in front of life-endangering situations.

But on exam day, Anxiety is your biggest enemy. Often, it makes the difference between achieving a top score or a low one.

The first thing you need to do to fight your anxiety is to prepare well. If you have prepared with Discipline (see blog post “Discipline – a key to success”), your confidence level will naturally be higher. Problems that may have once seemed unfamiliar now appear as similar to problems you have already solved and re-solved. This alone is a huge boost in tranquility.

Nevertheless, technical preparation is not enough. This is where most GMAT prep Courses fail their students. These classes equip students with all sorts of test knowledge—yet they leave out the one element that could make it or break it: a tool to keep Anxiety in check.

As NLP Practicioners, Jawad and Rowan know many techniques to reduce anxiety and raise confidence levels. In the next posts you will find two of the most simple, yet effective ones carefully hand-picked for you: Re-Framing and the Square of Power.

Learn how to handle your Anxiety, and you will add a powerful gear to your test preparation machine.

Want to Know More? Talk to a GMAT Coach today.

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About the author

Jawad Mastaki

Your GMAT Coach Deputy Coach Jawad Mastaki is a Bocconi University and London Business School alumnus. Jawad has international education and work experience across the U.S., China, Italy, Russia and the UK. He has formally trained for both GMAT and NLP, and now works with the YGC team in teaching and product development.